Planning & Validating

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  • Welcome to module two of the quiz, launching lab, all about planning and validating your quiz and using it as a lead magnet. So. Nothing is ever easy. I don't like to use the word easy. However, creating a quiz what's true is it's easier than it ever has been before. So that's thanks to technology because the tech really used to be the number one problem by far.
  • And again, it's not that it's easy. Um, there'll probably be a learning curve, but in general, Uh, creating a quiz is so much more accessible than it ever has been. What more to me ends up being the issue, uh, today, because technology has kind of alleviated that issue of actually creating a quiz. It comes down to proper planning and the validating of a quiz.
  • It really is your main concern. So let's start. First by talking about how to validate your quiz. Uh, these is not necessarily comprehensive, um, but it is just a starting point to help you validate your quiz. So the things to consider is you really do need meaningful outcomes. Um, if your quiz. Always leads to the same result.
  • Let's just say it always leads to suggesting that, you know, your program is just right for you. That's lame. Um, you really want to have meaningful outcomes because again, the most powerful part for your business truly with a quiz is the audience segmentation. So. If you are not really segmenting people, uh, quizzes is, you know, not, not the move basically.
  • So you want at least two different outcomes. Um, our quizzes tend to have either, uh, almost infinite, um, outcomes with our personal values assessment, because it's so personalized. You can choose something like between 80. Values you can choose. So the combination you choose 10. So there's some math to figure out how many combinations, but it's a lot, obviously.
  • Whereas our mindset quiz, for example, I believe there's five outcomes, maybe four. I can't quite remember, but either way you really need meaningful outcomes in your quiz or else. They're pointless. And another way to validate your quizzes to really just ask if it's interesting, because the content probably is important or else you wouldn't be considering creating a lead magnet around it.
  • So it's not to say that your content might not be interesting, but is that a piece of content put into the quiz? Um, Sort of mold. Is that interesting? And one thing that's great about quizzes is it can take some things that are quite kind of boring and not that interesting or are not boring, not that engaging maybe, but turning it into a quiz, all of a sudden makes this sort of, uh, less than.
  • Uh, super fascinating topic, um, but it can make it that much more interesting to explore and to learn about. So that's a sort of pro and con, uh, of a quiz is certain things, um, are not interesting as a quiz, but truthfully other things that are not interesting, if not a quiz can become, um, more engaging and interesting, um, for a potential client, uh, by making it a quiz.
  • So that's a sort of double-edged sword, I suppose. And also the thing to consider really is. With those outcomes is kind of goes hand in hand, but you really have to be able to provide meaningful. Follow-up it doesn't have to be some long, huge followup sequence and 10 things. It's not that, but each outcome really should have meaningful follow-up or else it's not very personal and therefore not a great quiz in general.
  • So when you're validating your quiz again, you want to make sure you have a minimum. I have two different outcomes you want to make sure and check in with you and maybe others perhaps. Um, By first exploring an interview with your perfect client model is this interesting. Has this peak your interest, these are the sorts of questions you'd want to ask.
  • Um, the types of people you would want to complete your quiz. It's always a good starting point, as well as asking yourself, can you provide actual, meaningful follow-up based on the results. And again, It could just be one single email with a practical tip based on that one meaningful outcome. That could be enough.
  • It doesn't have to be two emails or three emails or anything like that, but you do have to have meaningful followup. Now, when we start looking at planning your quiz, this is where you should begin. And again, it's not comprehensive, but for the most part, you really just begin with a blank Google doc, and you start, um, writing questions and really starting to explore it like that.
  • I don't think there's a. One way to begin a quiz, but I do think it just begins by you starting out with say four questions that you can come up with and just filling them in and seeing how it goes. So I'm not the most shocking of tips, but it's just really the fact that. A quiz, I think really taps into your creativity and how you're able to mold, um, your content and your ideas into this new way of articulating it.
  • And the best place to start is with a blank canvas. Um, in my world, the blank canvas is a blank Google doc. So maybe for you, it's a notepad, but that is where you begin to plan your quiz. Okay. And also when you think about questions, this is the most important thing. And we're going to show you, I'm going to show you examples to make sure this all makes sense.
  • But for the most part you want to be, you have to effectively ask true or false yes or no Likert scale question types, just because, um, these last two points, Likert scale questions in computer can make sense of it. These kind of go hand in hand when you're creating a quiz. Obviously, this is an automated thing.
  • We're going to use software and I'll show you how to do that. But you can't ask for someone to type in, you know, a long form free form, answer to a question because a computer can't make sense of that and they can't then, um, You know, per segment that list, like it's not possible. You have to ask questions that have, um, planned out meaningful answers that probably have to do with like a Likert scale from a scale of one to five or one to 10, whatever it happens to be.
  • But this is an important key part of planning your quiz, because that is again how a computer can make sense of it and segment your audience and provide meaningful up and all of those important things. So how does it work? How does a quiz provide, you know, how do you segment an audience? How do they answer these questions?
  • And then end up in various buckets. To for that specific outcome, the truth is simply put it's just math answers end up equaling a score. And that is how you get different outputs. And that is why the important of asking light court style questions, which I'll show you some examples of it. Doesn't have to be like one through five, but it does usually.
  • Have to be a scale or a true or false. Yes, no sort of thing, because those types of answers can be given a value and then those values can be tallied as a score, as they work through a quiz, therefore allowing you to, um, land them on their proper outcome based on their answers. So this can seem a little abstract.
  • So. I do have a relatively simple example that you'll see even a simple example with quizzes can be a little bit complex to build. So what I want to suggest that you do is. With the quiz launching lab with these modules, I suggest you follow along exactly creating this sample quiz with me. So where there's going to be tutorials that you can follow along.
  • And we are going to use this simple happiness quiz that I created. That's very, very basic, but. What I do suggest you do is you follow along exactly and create the exact, um, happiness quiz alongside me. Because to me, the best way to learn is by simply duplicating, because you're going to be learning new tools, new ideas, new ways of thinking, and you don't really want to.
  • Be learning all these new things and trying to be creative. That's my suggestion to you. So I suggest you follow along exactly and create, um, this happiness quiz alongside me. And then after go back and sort of create your own version for your own quiz, that will probably be more complex. But I do suggest you start off by following, along with me.
  • Exactly. Because I do think that's the best way to learn something new.
  • So what is our simple example? Like I said, it is a happiness quiz, so I have four questions here to start to have someone to explore their happiness. So just to be clear, this is completely made up and arbitrary. Um, so yeah, let's keep that in mind. Um, I think it's going to be fun. I think it'll show you.
  • It allows me to show you all the great features and how to put together a meaningful quiz in a more simple way. But I just want to be clear that this is not a real lead magnet. This is not something I would actually use. This is a boiled down simple example. So with all that out of the way, I have four questions.
  • So it's really about how happy you are. And we're kind of the ideas to explore these four areas, your work life, your relationship, your finances, and your health. And you can see these numbers one through five. This is basically how happy are you at work? One through five in your relationships, one through five, et cetera, et cetera.
  • So with four questions total, in our example, we're going to go over the math. So sorry about that. I know math is hard, um, certainly is for me, but. Um, I think you'll see overall when, how it's planned out. You'll see why I use a simple example because. Although a more complex example, uh, or a complex quiz, yours will probably be more complex, but the reality is it just takes a little bit more time, a little bit more brainpower, but these fundamentals, um, will always apply.
  • So that's why we keep it simple to start with. So on our happiness quiz, we have. Or questions total, the lowest possible answer would be four, right? Because we're asking for questions and the lowest someone can choose is a one. Okay. So one times four is four. So that's our lowest possible answer. The highest possible answer is 20 that's because we have four questions and they could select five on all of them.
  • So we're just trying to. Calculate the full range of possible outcomes for our quiz. So five times four is 20. That's our highest possible answers. Now I have identified, um,
  • now I have identified five possible outcomes and that is something that I made up by the way. So we're going to be splitting up this, these 16, right? The difference between four and 20 is 16. So there's 16 possible stages, um, between, um, Between all the stages, right. And I've identified five possible outcomes.
  • And, um, that's just what I happened to do to show you how to do this and build out the example. But just so you know that this four has nothing to do with the lowest or highest possible answer. It's just what you, what I have identified. And you will identify with your quiz, how many possible outcomes there are.
  • So for this example, we're going with five, basically two on the negative side. One neutral in the middle and then two on the positive. And, uh, that's just how I decided to break this down. Um, so let's just continue working this example. So let's just say how happy I am at work. I'm a five out of five in my relationships.
  • I'm a one out of five. My finances are a four to five and my health is a two out of five. So if I were to create that. Sort of scale from less happy to more happy. Um, I, I had to add this up, obviously this would equal 12, so five, six, 10, 12. So that's where I get this from. And you can see that I just broke this into four.

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Overview
Overview
Why Quizzes?
Why Quizzes?
17:30
Planning & Validating
Planning & Validating
17:15
Let's Talk Tech
Let's Talk Tech
8:20
Using Typeform
Using Typeform
[Typeform] Create Your Account
[Typeform] Create Your Account
4:58
[Typeform] Building the Quiz
[Typeform] Building the Quiz
31:53
[Typeform] Results Email: Simple or Hard(er)
[Typeform] Results Email: Simple or Hard(er)
8:20
[Typeform] Results Email: Simple
[Typeform] Results Email: Simple
38:32
[Typeform] Results Email: Hard(er)
[Typeform] Results Email: Hard(er)
41:23
Using Interact
Using Interact
[Interact] Create Your Account
[Interact] Create Your Account
2:47
[Interact] Building the Quiz
[Interact] Building the Quiz
18:52
[Interact] Results Emails
[Interact] Results Emails
23:46
Conclusion
Conclusion
Creating Your Quiz
Creating Your Quiz
6:27